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In 2013, the sea ice in Antarctica reached a record high (GMAT CR Assumption)

GMAT Critical Reasoning South Pole AssumptionIn 2013, the sea ice in Antarctica reached a record high. 80% of the increase in ice volume can be attributed to the strong westerly winds in the South Pole. The ice level is much higher than the recorded ice level during the 1970s. This proves that Global Warming is a hoax.

The argument above is based on which of the following assumptions?

a) Global warming and sea ice level are correlated.
b) Sea Ice Level in Antarctica has a stronger correlation to Global Warming
c) One of the effects of Global Warming is the melting of sea ice.
d) Increase in Ice Volume is the result of low temperature
e) There was no interruption in collecting data about sea ice level from 1970 to 2013

This is an interesting assumption question. Some of the answer choices look similar and equally relevant. Before we go into answer choices, let us look into the arguments and conclusion.

Fact 1: In 2013, the sea ice in Antarctica reached a record high.

Fact 2: 80% of the increase in ice volume can be attributed to the strong westerly winds in the South Pole

Fact 3: The ice level is much higher than the recorded ice level during the 1970s

Conclusion: Global Warming is a hoax


Most GMAT Critical Reasoning questions will have 1 to 2 facts. The third fact supports Fact 1.

a) Global warming and sea ice level are correlated.

This is a basic assumption but there is a difference between correlation and causation. Two independent variables can be correlated but it does not prove that one caused the other.
For the above argument to work , the assumption is that Global Warming causes sea ice level to melt.

Eliminate Option A

b) Sea Ice Level in Antarctica has a stronger correlation to Global Warming

Similar reasoning to Option a. Even though Sea Ice Level in Antarctica and Global Warming has a stronger correlation, the causation is not clear.

c) One of the effects of Global Warming is the melting of sea ice.

This is a much direct assumption that is relevant for the argument. In fact, this statement shows that Global warming causes melting of sea ice.

Keep Option C

d) Increase in Ice Volume is the result of low temperature

Although this is relevant information, this information just adds to the fact that strong winds causes increase in Ice Volume.

Not Relevant. Eliminate Option D

e) There was no interruption in collecting data about sea ice level from 1970 to 2013

Although this is an assumption that is required to compare Ice Volume in 1970 with that of 2013, interruption in itself does not prove that the trend of decreasing ice volume cannot be attributed to Global Warming.

From the above options, C is the only relevant assumption for the argument.

Mastering GMAT Critical Reasoning (2019 Edition)

Chapters

1) Introduction   
2) 6 Step Strategy to solve GMAT Critical Reasoning Questions   
3) How to overcome flawed thinking in GMAT Critical Reasoning?   
4) 4 GMAT Critical Reasoning Fallacies   
5) Generalization in GMAT Critical Reasoning   
6) Inconsistencies in Arguments   
7) Eliminate Out of Scope answer choices using Necessary and Sufficient Conditions   
8) Ad Hominem in GMAT Critical Reasoning   
9) Slippery Slope in GMAT Critical Reasoning   
10) Affirming the Consequent – GMAT Critical Reasoning   
11) How to Paraphrase GMAT Critical Reasoning Question   
12) How to Answer Assumption Question Type   
13) How to Answer Conclusion Question Type   
14) How to Answer Inference Question Type   
15) How to Answer Strengthen Question Type   
16) How to Answer Weaken Question Type   
17) How to Answer bold-faced and Summary Question Types   
18) How to Answer Parallel Reasoning Questions   
19) How to Answer the Fill in the Blanks Question   
Question Bank   
Question 1: 5G Technology (Inference)   
Question 2: Water Purifier vs. Minerals (Fill in the Blanks)   
Question 3: Opioid Abuse (Strengthens)   
Question 4: Abe and Japan’s Economy (Inference)   
Question 5: Indians and Pulse Import (Weakens)   
Question 6: Retail Chains in Latin America (Assumption)   
Question 7: American Tax Rates – Republican vs. Democrats (Inference)   
Question 8: AI – China vs the US (Weakens)   
Question 9: Phone Snooping (Strengthens)   
Question 10:  Traditional Lawns (Assumption)   
Question 11:  Appraisal-Tendency Framework (Inference)   
Question 12:  Meta-Analysis of Diet Trials (Weakens)   
Question 13:  Biases in AI (Strengthens)   
Question 14:  Stock Price and Effectiveness of Leadership (Inference)   
Question 15:  US Border Wall (Weakens)   
Question 16:  Driverless Car and Pollution (Assumption)   
Question 17:  Climate Change (Inference)   
Question 18:  Rent a Furniture (Weakens)   
Question 19:  Marathon Performance and Customized Shoes (Weakens)   
Question 20:  Guaranteed Basic Income (Assumption)   
Question 21:  Brexit (Infer)   
Question 22:  AB vs Traditional Hotels (Assumption)   
Question 23:  Tax Incentive and Job Creation (Weakens)   
Question 24:  Obesity and Sleeve Gastrectomy (Inference)   
Question 25:  Recruiting Executives (Weaken)   

Answers with Detailed Explanation

Download Mastering GMAT Critical Reasoning (2019 Edition)




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