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GMAT


How GMAT Scoring Algorithm Works?


Categories : GMAT Score

GMAT AlgorithmThe GMAT is a computer-adaptive test where your score is calculated by an algorithm that provides you with harder questions (and higher score returns) when you answer previous questions correctly, and with easier questions (and lower returns) when you’ve answered previous questions incorrectly.

Through this method, the GMAT can determine your ability level in a relatively short period – 37 math and 41 verbal questions – and provide you with an immediate score upon completion of the test. To save you the stress of trying to figure out the secrets of the algorithm, here are some important things you should know about GMAT scoring:


1) Good news: You can get a lot of questions wrong and still do well!

The job of the GMAT scoring algorithm is to determine your ability level by asking you questions that begin to close in on it. Think of how you’d play a game of 20 Questions as you attempt to zero in on the historical figure that your “opponent” has selected:

Was this person famous in the era BC? (No – too early)

Was this person famous before the Middle Ages? (No – still too early)

Was this person famous before the...


GMAT Sentence Correction Strategies - Focus on Testable sections



Sentence Correction questions can include up to 54 words, making for incredibly long sentences and time consuming reading.  But similar to GMAT SC - Spot Decision Points, knowing what is likely to be a testable section of a sentence and what is not, you can break apart the sentence into the parts that matter to you as a test-taker.  Proper nouns, correctly-applied modifiers, adjectives and adverbs can all be streamlined to make for shorter sentences

For example, in the sentence:

Originally called BackRub, Google was founded by two Stanford PhD students, Larry Page, whose father, Dr. Carl Victor Page, was a computer science professor at Michigan State University, and Sergey Brin.

The proper nouns and excessive adjectives can be eliminated or condensed, bringing you down to:

Originally called BackRub, Google was founded by two students, Larry, whose father, Carl, was a...


How to start preparing for the GMAT Quant Section



Some of you have left Math behind, never to touch it again and all of a sudden GMAT comes along :-) . You know that you were good in Math but now that since there has been a lag; there is always a fear to catch up on the fundamentals. The lines, polygons, integers, triangles and the worst of all-permutation and probability start to bother you. You know you knew this stuff- Infact you were always a grade A student and know to have to get back on it.

What’s the best way to get at it? Well there are different strategies and people figure out what works for them and what does not. But always remember this- If you were good in Math at one point of time, you are still good in Math. You have not lost your Quant and so do not loose faith…. Have confidence. It’s just a matter of days before you can catch on to it and then GMAT Quant is fun and you will enjoy it. The best way to work the Quant preparation is to get to the Official Guide notes and go through them. Try to not only read them but also try to derive, think and work out similar formulas. This will brush up some of the formulas and the topics. Also, this is what you can do if you want fast results. Read a topic from the Official Guide, and immediately get to the Grockit site and play a game on those topics preferably in groups. That would bring out a lot of questions and while discussion you will tend to get the old Math concepts from...


GMAT Fractions - Don't get lost in the calculations



Have you wondered how writers can make a seemingly simple GMAT topic like fractions into time-consuming calculations. One strategy that GMAT test takers must adopt to simplify the calculations. For example

Dividing by 5 is the same as multiplying by 2/10. For example:

• 840/5 = ?
• 840/5 = 840*(2/10) = 84*2 = 168

Multiplying or dividing by 10’s and 2’s is generally easier than using 5’s. 90% of the time, fractions will be easier to perform arithmetic. Decimals are sometimes more useful when comparing numbers relative to one another, such as in a number line, but these questions are the exception. Even if given a decimal (or percent) looks easy, quickly convert to a fraction. Some common ones to memorize:

• 1/9 = 0.111 repeating
• 1/8 = 0.125
• 1/7 = ~0.14
• 1/6 = 0.166 repeating
• 1/5 = 0.20
• 1/4 = 0.25
• 1/3 = 0.333 repeating
• 1/2 = 0.5 repeating

Note: Multiples of these, such as 3/8 (0.375) are also important to remember, but can easily be derived by multiplying the original fraction (1/8 * 3 = 3/8 = 0.125 * 3 = 0.375)

Denominators are super important. A denominator of a reduced fraction with a multiple of 7 will not have a finite...


GMAT Simple Interest and Compound Interest



Compound and Simple Interest GMATSimple interest and compound interest - essential topics for an MBA. GMAC thinks the same too. So you will find these questions randomly distributed in your GMAT Exam.

Simple interest is the most basic and is a function of P, the principle amount of money invested, the interest rate earned on the principle, i, and the amount of time the money is invested, t (this is usually stated in periods, such as years or months).

The resulting equation is:

Interest = iPt

In basic terms, the above equation tells us the amount of interest that would be earned on a principle amount invested (P), for a given time (t) at a given interest rate (i).

Example
If you invested $1,000 (P = your principle) for one year (t = one year) at 6% simple interest (i = given interest rate), you would get $60 in interest at the end of the year and would have a total of $1,060.

For compound interest, you would earn slightly more. Let’s look at similar type problem, though this one involves compound interest.
...


What is the greatest prime factor of 12!11! + 11!10!?


Categories : Number Properties

What is the greatest prime factor of 12!11! + 11!10!?

(A) 7
(B) 11
(C) 13
(D) 17
(E) 19

Solution

While it is common for students to simply look at the numbers 12!, 11!, and 10! and see that the highest naturally-occurring prime number is 11, it is  important to know that this is an addition problem – the numbers 12!11! and 11!10! are combined to create a new number that may well have a higher prime factor than its factorial components.

When adding large numbers like factorials and exponents, it is  often quite helpful to factor out common terms. In this case, it’s particularly important, because our entire goal is to break out the large sum into prime factors so that we can determine which is biggest. Each term has a common 11!, so by factoring that out we can get from:

12!11! + 11!10!
to
11! (12! + 10!)

Now, 12! includes a 10! – it’s essentially 12 * 11 * 10!, so we have a common 10! within the parentheses that can also be factored out, going from:

11! (12*11*10! + 10!)
to
11!10! (12*11 + 1)

At this point, the largest prime factor must be either the 11 outside the...


4 Tricks that will Keep you focused on your GMAT Reading Comprehension



GMAT RC FocussedGMAT Reading Comprehension passages are complicated and boring texts that will test your concentration and stamina. It is easy to lose your focus after an energy draining AWA and Math section. Most GMAT test takers will start to zone out at this stage and will just stare at the screen, re-reading the same sentence again and again. This is a sure shot step to crash your GMAT 700+ dream.

Follow these four preparation and test day tricks and you will learn to keep your focus for a long duration of time

Start practicing GMAT-like texts

It’s obvious that a reading comp passage won’t be as thrilling as your favorite Dan Brown novel, but the GMAT actually makes RC passages boring on purpose. The test-makers go out of their way to make the text complex, and they like to use natural science and social science topics with which potential business-school students may not be familiar. To prepare yourself, start reading real-world texts that mimic GMAT passage structures. The Economist, Scientific American, and The Wall Street Journal are good places to start, and magazines like Time and Newsweek feature editorial articles that can help you learn...


Three Types of GMAT Profit and Loss Problems



You will encounter the following three types of Profit/Loss problems in the GMAT:

Profit/loss as percentage of Cost Price

In this case you will be given the cost price and sales price, and will be asked to simply calculate the profit/loss incurred by the seller by entering into the given transaction. This will be done by dividing the difference between the Sales Price and the Cost Price by the Cost Price. To convert the decimal into a percentage, you will multiply it by 100.

Profit Percentage = ((Sales Price - Cost Price)/Cost Price) x 100

Selling price = Z x (Cost price)

Where Z is any positive number. When Z < 1 we have a loss. When Z = 1 we have neither profit nor loss. When Z > 1 we have a profit.

Profit or Loss % = (Z - 1) x 100.

Selling price = [(Y / 100) + 1]x (Cost price)

Where Y is the profit or loss percentage. When Y < 0 we have a loss. When Y = 0 we have neither profit nor loss. When Y > 0 we have a profit.

Profit/loss as percentage of Sales Price

Sometimes the problem will be worded differently and will require the test taker to calculate...


GMAT Statistics Fundamentals - Mean, Mode, Range, Median and Standard Deviation



GMAT StatisticsEven if you fear statistics by its reputation, it is one of the easiest sections in the GMAT because a standard set of questions is asked and anyone who understands the fundamentals that I shall describe will be able to ace the questions. The three most basic topics in stats are mean, mode, and median. Usually, the GMAT will go one step further into range and standard deviation.

Mean: Mean is the average. Let’s say there are two numbers: 6 and 8. The mean would be:
(6+8)/2 =14/2 =7. If you analyze the number 7, it makes sense that it is average of 6 and 8. Using the same approach, the mean of n numbers a1,a2,a3…….an would be (a1+a2+a3…..+an)/n. If you remember this formula, you should be able to do well with mean questions. We shall discuss some of the standard questions in subsequent blogs, but for right now, remember the key formula and start doing some mean and average questions from Grockit games.

Mode: Let’s say that you are given a set of numbers, such as {4,3,7,9,9,11,10}. In order to find the mode, you have to arrange the numbers in ascending...


GMAT Critical Reasoning – How to solve the weakness question type?



Start solving the GMAT Critical Reasoning weaken question by reading the question first. Why? This would help you determine the task before you go into the argument.

For example:

Healica, a new drug that can cure a common disease that until now has been fatal for 50% of those infected, is made from the root of the New Zealand banananut tree.  The banananut tree is rare in New Zealand, and large quantities of the root are necessary in order to make Healica.  Therefore, if Healica remains in production, the banananut tree will eventually become extinct.

If true, which of the following most calls into question the conclusion above?

a) The company that holds the patent to Healica has exclusive rights to produce the drug for another 10 years.
b) Healica is expensive, and is not currently covered by most major insurance plans.
c) Banananut leaves are considered a gourmet delicacy in many parts of the world.
d) The banananut tree, although native to New Zealand, can easily be grown in other parts of the world.
e) Producing Healica is time-consuming and expensive for the drug manufacturer.
...


GMAT Data Sufficiency Strategy - The Obvious Answer Trap


Categories : Data Sufficiency

GMAT DS Obvious Answer TrapData Sufficiency questions are supposed to be hard; more so than any other question type they tend to represent a chess match between you and the author, as the author has two chances to get you to make a mistake.  She won’t likely waste either statement giving you an easy pass – the questions have to elicit something from you in terms of efficiency or ingenuity in order to answer them correctly, so if an answer choice seems obvious within 15-20 seconds and you can’t spot a trap, well, you just fell into the trap.  Consider the question:

What is the value of x?

1) 3x + 2y = 15

2)  y = (-3/2) (x – 5)

This should pretty obviously be C. 

Two equations, two variables, neither works alone but both work together, right? 

But that is too easy, and the GMAT won’t often give you the answer that quickly.  Much as though the author had moved a pawn...


GMAT Will Wear you Down: Avoid Unnecessary calculations and Don't Analyze Unnecessary Verbiage



GMAT Save Time and EnergyThe GMAT finds much of its competitive advantage in its ability to wear down its unsuspecting challengers, who perform unnecessary calculations on the quantitative side and reading and analyzing unnecessary verbiage on the verbal side, while all the while the GMAT packs its "knockout punch" in the form of a subtle uniqueness in the line of questioning that a tired examinee is unlikely to notice.

In order to combat this opponent, be sure to seek out opportunities to save time and energy when possible:

Quantitative Section


When answering a Data Sufficiency question, once you know that you will get one definitive answer, you can stop performing the calculation. The actual answer does not matter, as the question is only concerned with whether you will, indeed, arrive at an answer.

When calculating the answer for a Problem Solving question, consider the answer choices and whether an estimate, or a property of the correct value (does it have to be even? Must it be negative?) will be...


GMAT Statistics Fundamentals - Mean, Mode, Range, Median and Standard Deviation



GMAT StatisticsEven if you fear statistics by its reputation, it is one of the easiest sections in the GMAT because a standard set of questions is asked and anyone who understands the fundamentals that I shall describe will be able to ace the questions. The three most basic topics in stats are mean, mode, and median. Usually, the GMAT will go one step further into range and standard deviation.

Mean: Mean is the average. Let’s say there are two numbers: 6 and 8. The mean would be:
(6+8)/2 =14/2 =7. If you analyze the number 7, it makes sense that it is average of 6 and 8. Using the same approach, the mean of n numbers a1,a2,a3…….an would be (a1+a2+a3…..+an)/n. If you remember this formula, you should be able to do well with mean questions. We shall discuss some of the standard questions in subsequent blogs, but for right now, remember the key formula and start doing some mean and average questions from Grockit games.

Mode: Let’s say that you are given a set of numbers, such as {4,3,7,9,9,11,10}. In order to find the mode, you have to arrange the numbers in ascending...


Non-native English speakers - GMAT Verbal Study Plan designed for you!



Non-Native Speaker GMAT Verbal Study PlanEnglish, like all living languages, is complex and constantly-changing; what is acceptable in spoken English is not always accepted in Standard (written) English.  The key to improving your English reading, processing, and writing skills for the GMAT is consistent high-quality practice.  It's true that native speakers have a big advantage -- they have typically been listening to correct English for at least two decades.  Non-native speakers, however, have a small advantage -- they (unlike native speakers) have not been listening to incorrect English for two decades.  Build your study around quality writing and daily practice -- and start as early as you can.


Quality writing:

New Yorker
The Economist
Harper's Magazine
The Atlantic

...


GMAT Fractions - Don't get lost in the calculations



Have you wondered how writers can make a seemingly simple GMAT topic like fractions into time-consuming calculations. One strategy that GMAT test takers must adopt to simplify the calculations. For example

Dividing by 5 is the same as multiplying by 2/10. For example:

• 840/5 = ?
• 840/5 = 840*(2/10) = 84*2 = 168

Multiplying or dividing by 10’s and 2’s is generally easier than using 5’s. 90% of the time, fractions will be easier to perform arithmetic. Decimals are sometimes more useful when comparing numbers relative to one another, such as in a number line, but these questions are the exception. Even if given a decimal (or percent) looks easy, quickly convert to a fraction. Some common ones to memorize:

• 1/9 = 0.111 repeating
• 1/8 = 0.125
• 1/7 = ~0.14
• 1/6 = 0.166 repeating
• 1/5 = 0.20
• 1/4 = 0.25
• 1/3 = 0.333 repeating
• 1/2 = 0.5 repeating

Note: Multiples of these, such as 3/8 (0.375) are also important to remember, but can easily be derived by multiplying the original fraction (1/8 * 3 = 3/8 = 0.125 * 3 = 0.375)

Denominators are super important. A denominator of a reduced fraction with a multiple of 7 will not have a finite...