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GMAT


International Students - Are you ready for GMAT Verbal?


Categories : GMAT Verbal

For some international students who are new to the language, ESL classes might be a necessary step before they even start thinking about business school . For others, whose foundation in English grammar is stronger, study time may be better spent reading books in English, writing essays, taking practice tests, or doing focused grammar drills. So how can you know whether your English is at the right level for the GMAT?

Simply put, to do well on the GMAT you should know enough English to function in a university environment. First, check your proficiency by listening to sample lectures on Youtube. This is a practical recommendation that pertains to spoken as well as written English. In business school you will be expected to make arguments, back up opinions, and discuss case studies in depth. You should be comfortable stating your opinions and answering questions. Though you want to have better grammar than Borat or Jackie Chan, don’t worry if you have an accent or make a few mistakes when speaking.

Here’s an easy test: Watch a movie in English without subtitles; try something business related, like Glengarry GlenRoss, Wall Street, or Working Girl if you can. When you’re done, read a detailed summary of its plot online. If you find that you missed out on...


GMAT 800 with Video Explanation - A newborn kangaroo, or joey



A newborn kangaroo, or joey, is born after a short gestation period of only 39 days. At this stage, the joey’s hind limbs are not well developed, but its forelimbs are well developed, so that it can can climb from the cloaca into its mother’s pouch for further development. The recent discovery that ancient marsupial lions were also born with only their forelimbs developed supports the hypothesis that newborn marsupial lions must also have needed to climb into their mothers’ pouches.

The argument in this passage relies on which of the following assumptions?

[A] All animals that are born after a short gestation period are born with some parts of their bodies underdeveloped.
[B] Well developed forelimbs would have been more advantageous to ancient marsupial lions than well developed hind limbs would have been.
[C] If the newborn marsupial lion did not climb into its mother’s pouch, then paleontologists would be able to find evidence of this fact.
[D] Newborn marsupial lions that crawled into their mothers’ pouches could not have done so had they not had only their forelimbs developed at birth.
[E] Newborn marsupial lions would not have had only their forelimbs developed if this development were of no use to the marsupial lions.


...

How to solve GMAT Subject Verb Agreement Questions(Video)



Video Summary

1) First GMAT Subject Verb Agreement Practice Question
Expert instructors Jen Rugani and Dave Ingber explain how to solve the first tricky GMAT Subject Verb Agreement Questions

Techniques used

  • Process of Elimination
  • Spotting Error
  • Read the answer choice one final time
...

GMAT Sentence Correction Strategies - Use Logic



GMAT SC LogicThe single-most crucial type of Sentence Correction error, Modifiers, Comparisons, and Verb Tenses all share one thing in common: you do not  need to be an expert editor to recognize that this sentence is illogical!  The introductory phrase in this sentence, “the single-most type…” is clearly meant to describe one item, but the rest of the sentence lists three.  This does not make logical sense!  Technically you’d call this a modifier error, in that the modifying phrase to begin the sentence – recognizable because it begins the sentence, is separated by a comma, and does not include its own subject and verb (note: these aren’t essential characteristics of any modifier, but they are one surefire way to identify a commonly-occurring type of modifier in which SC errors often crop up) – does not logically modify the noun that follows.

If you want to get really technical, it is an appositive modifier (a noun phrase used to describe another noun), but the GMAT will never require you to describe the...


(GMAT 800) Market research has shown that the newest model of E-Phone



Market research has shown that the newest model of E-Phone gained widespread popularity not due to technical superiority but through seamless and intuitive design.

A. gained widespread popularity not due to technical superiority but through seamless
B. gained widespread popularity not only due to technical superiority but also through seamless
C. did not gain widespread popularity due to technical superiority but through seamless
D. did not gain widespread popularity in consideration of technical superiority but rather due to seamless
E. gaining widespread popularity not due to technical superiority but also through seamless


Explanation:  
In the construction "not...but", the words following "not" and "but" should be in parallel form. In this case, "not" and "but" are parallel because they are both followed by a phrase.

a.Choice A is the correct answer. "Not" and "but" are each followed by a phrase, and so are parallel. Also, "gained" is the correct past tense construction for the concept.
b.Choice B is not the correct answer. This changes the meaning of the sentence.
c.Choice C is not the correct answer. The verb "gain" follows "not", but a phrase follows "but," so the construction is not parallel.
d.Choice D is not the correct...


GMAT Sentence Correction Strategies - Use Logic



GMAT SC LogicThe single-most crucial type of Sentence Correction error, Modifiers, Comparisons, and Verb Tenses all share one thing in common: you do not  need to be an expert editor to recognize that this sentence is illogical!  The introductory phrase in this sentence, “the single-most type…” is clearly meant to describe one item, but the rest of the sentence lists three.  This does not make logical sense!  Technically you’d call this a modifier error, in that the modifying phrase to begin the sentence – recognizable because it begins the sentence, is separated by a comma, and does not include its own subject and verb (note: these aren’t essential characteristics of any modifier, but they are one surefire way to identify a commonly-occurring type of modifier in which SC errors often crop up) – does not logically modify the noun that follows.

If you want to get really technical, it is an appositive modifier (a noun phrase used to describe another noun), but the GMAT will never require you to describe the...


Understanding "Of" for GMAT Quant and Verbal Sections



Word OfOne of the smallest and least noteworthy words in the English language, the word “of” is crucial to your success on the GMAT, on both the quantitative and verbal sides of the exam. It is of great importance that you recognize these two common appearances of, and traps set by, the word “of“:

1) Sentence Correction

In Sentence Correction questions, the word “of” is usually employed as a modifier, which the GMAT often throws in to lengthen sentences and distract you from subject-verb agreement errors. Consider the following items:

The number of applicants to business schools are increasing given the current economic climate.

The House of Representatives are meeting this week to continue working on an environmental bill.

In each instance, the subject is actually the singular noun before the word “of” – “of applicants to business schools” just tells us “which number?”, and “of Representatives” simply indicates “which House?”. The authors of the GMAT know that examinees are often unsure of which noun to choose as the subject; by using the word “of” to set up modifiers with multiple nouns, the writers can exacerbate this problem. If you...


GMAT Critical Reasoning – How to solve the weakness question type?



Start solving the GMAT Critical Reasoning weaken question by reading the question first. Why? This would help you determine the task before you go into the argument.

For example:

Healica, a new drug that can cure a common disease that until now has been fatal for 50% of those infected, is made from the root of the New Zealand banananut tree.  The banananut tree is rare in New Zealand, and large quantities of the root are necessary in order to make Healica.  Therefore, if Healica remains in production, the banananut tree will eventually become extinct.

If true, which of the following most calls into question the conclusion above?

a) The company that holds the patent to Healica has exclusive rights to produce the drug for another 10 years.
b) Healica is expensive, and is not currently covered by most major insurance plans.
c) Banananut leaves are considered a gourmet delicacy in many parts of the world.
d) The banananut tree, although native to New Zealand, can easily be grown in other parts of the world.
e) Producing Healica is time-consuming and expensive for the drug manufacturer.
...


How to handle nerves on GMAT test day?


Categories : GMAT Exam Day Tips

Handling Nerves on GMAT Test DayTest day is no different than any other GMAT prep days. You have to be focused, prepared and give your best shot. But we are not robots, we are humans. So it is natural to feel a little bit anxious. But if you feel: cold sweats, night terrors, the shakes, and so on, then you are showing signs of acute anxiety. Knowing what to expect in the testing center will help you relieve some of the unnecessary anxiety. Here is Knewton's minute by minute breakdown of what to expect in the test center.

1. Arrive early, but don’t plan on studying at the testing center. 30 minutes before liftoff

Show up to the test center 30 minutes before the official time, as the GMAC suggests. Although this may mean waking up even earlier than expected, avoiding any feeling of being rushed is priceless. However, many testing centers don’t allow studying in the waiting room, so don’t plan on getting there early and reviewing notes. Use the time before the test to relax and focus on the task at hand.

2. Locker Room. 10 minutes before liftoff

After presenting your identification and test reservation, you may be given...


Proportions


Categories : Ratio and Proportion

A proportion is represented by two ratios which are equated to each other. In GMAT Quant questions, we would be presented with one variable and three values for proportions. Reduce the ratio in either side to the lowest possible value before cross-multiplying.

For example , a proportion can be presented as a/b = c/d or a:b = c:d

So as per our strategy reduce a/b to the smallest possible fraction

ex: 24/10 should be translated to 12/5

GMAT Proportion: A football field is 9600 square yards.  If 1200 pounds of fertilizer are spread evenly across the entire field, how many pounds of fertilizer were spread over an area of the field totaling 3600 square yards?

A. 450
B. 600
C. 750
D. 2400
E. 3200

The key word here is “spread evenly”. This implies that the relationship of fertilizer per square foot is uniform, and you can set equal the relationship of the wholes to the relationship of the parts.

A/F = 9600/1200 = 3600/x

Clearly, we can eliminate the zeros on the left side:

9600/1200 = 3600/x

96/12 = 3600/x

Then we can divide 96/12:

8 = 3600/x

Here, we can still reduce left-to-right, by canceling 4 in both:

2 = 900/x

Oh wait! There’s more! Both 2 and 900 are divisible by 2!
...


How to Ace GMAT Critical reasoning application questions



GMAT Critical reasoning application questions go one step further than Inference questions, asking you to apply what you have learned from the passage to a different or hypothetical situation. For these questions, it’s important to ignore the answer choices until you’ve effectively broken down the passage. Understand the author’s argument. Some application questions will focus on the author’s point of view. Just like you would for a critical reasoning passage, identify the author’s conclusion and the evidence provided. Put yourself in the author’s shoes and ask yourself questions. What is my argument? What would make my argument stronger? What might weaken it?

1) Focus on process

2) Pay attention to how a particular process is performed
For example, if the passage focuses on describing an experiment, you must clarify step-by-step how the experiment is carried out, before you can apply that same method to a different situation.

3)
Go back through the passage and list the verbs on your scratch pad. This will help you to understand the steps of the process and not confuse the sequence.

...


How GMAT Scoring Algorithm Works?


Categories : GMAT Score

GMAT AlgorithmThe GMAT is a computer-adaptive test where your score is calculated by an algorithm that provides you with harder questions (and higher score returns) when you answer previous questions correctly, and with easier questions (and lower returns) when you’ve answered previous questions incorrectly.

Through this method, the GMAT can determine your ability level in a relatively short period – 37 math and 41 verbal questions – and provide you with an immediate score upon completion of the test. To save you the stress of trying to figure out the secrets of the algorithm, here are some important things you should know about GMAT scoring:


1) Good news: You can get a lot of questions wrong and still do well!

The job of the GMAT scoring algorithm is to determine your ability level by asking you questions that begin to close in on it. Think of how you’d play a game of 20 Questions as you attempt to zero in on the historical figure that your “opponent” has selected:

Was this person famous in the era BC? (No – too early)

Was this person famous before the Middle Ages? (No – still too early)

Was this person famous before the...


GMAT Solid Geometry - Rectangular Solids and Cylinders



Rectangular Solid

Learn the concepts behind volume and surface area before you start solving GMAT Solid geometry problems. All solid geometry problems come down to this - length, breadth and height. For data sufficiency questions, look out for values of l, b and h. if any of them are missing then it would be easy to eliminate answer choices.

GMAT Rectangle

6 rectangular faces constitute a rectangular solid
 
The formulas you need to remember for a rectangular solid are

Volume = Length (l) x Width (w) x Height (h)

Surface Area = (2 x Length x Width) + (2 x Length x Height) + (2 x Width x Height)


"If length = width = height, that means that the rectangular solid is, in fact, a cube."


Terminologies

Vertex: Wow! quite a confusing word? Not really

Vertex = Corner

a) Vertex is the number of corners in a...


5 Steps for GMAT Data Interpretation



Data Interpretations GMAT1. Read the labels first. Mentally categorize each graph, chart and table. (EX: “This is a graph showing the change in the price of gas per gallon over the course of one year.”) Do not just skip the statistics entirely and go straight to the question! While you may think this will save you time, it actually significantly decreases your accuracy.

Data Interpretation questions are like an open-book test. You wouldn’t skip a Reading Comp passage, so don’t skip the data. Make sure you read every tiny piece of writing on or near the data, including titles, the labels for the x and y-axes, column names, and even footnotes. Scroll down to make sure you’ve caught everything.

2. Note the units. Once you understand the labels, take special care to note the units (mph, m/sec, cm2, etc.). Are we dealing with seconds, minutes, or hours? Does one graph represent the month of June, while the other graph represents the entire year? The units may change from graph-to-graph or chart-to-table. Especially note any given information about percentages, as DI questions frequently require you to work with...


GMAT Formal Logic Basics: And, or, neither, nor…



GMAT LogicWe’ve covered, in an earlier blog post, how to deal with the simplest formal logic statement: If X, then Y.  But what happens when our necessary or sufficient factors become more complicated?  Let’s look at a couple of examples, using the idea of a vegetable salad.  The simplest statement and its contrapositive might look like this:

If the salad has lettuce, then it has tomatoes.
If the salad has no tomatoes, then it has no lettuce.

Now let’s add more vegetables (and more complicated logic):

If the salad has lettuce or spinach, then it has tomatoes and peppers.

Here’s an important idea: when you are forming a contrapositive, you already know that the necessary and sufficient factors are switched around and negated.  But now you also have to remember that “and” becomes “or,” and vice versa.  So the statement above becomes:

If the salad has no tomatoes or no peppers, then it has no lettuce and no spinach.

I find it extremely helpful to individually negate each element of the statement; otherwise, it’s easy to get confused. ...